PSCI 4821: International Conflict

Dr. Paul Hensel
Phone: 369-7330
phensel@unt.edu
http://www.paulhensel.org
Office: 165 WH

Please note that this web page does not include the full syllabus for this course. The remainder of the syllabus -- most notably the schedule of assigned readings, course exams, and other assignments -- is only available in the full syllabus (in PDF format). Be sure to print out that complete syllabus and be familiar with it, so that you do not fall behind or miss any assignments during the semester.

Course Description

The primary purpose of this course is to examine the conditions that make for war and peace in world politics, as well as the range of possible solutions that might help to prevent this problem in the future. The course begins with an examination of historical patterns and trends in modern warfare. Later sections of the course then examine the causes or correlates of war, the outcomes and consequences of war, and solutions that have been offered to help prevent or limit war.

Upon completion of this course, students should be familiar with many of the factors that seem to create, worsen, or reduce military conflict between nation-states. Students should be able to apply these factors in examining real-world scenarios, such as studying historical cases of war or assessing the prospects for future conflict in troubled areas of the world. Students are expected to finish the course readings before the class period for which they are assigned, attend class regularly, show up to class on time, and participate actively in class discussion. The course will also require a midterm, quizzes, a research paper, and a final exam.

Required Texts

Course Requirements

(1) Examinations: two noncumulative essay exams are required. Each exam will be worth 25% of the total course grade.

(2) Research Papers: one 10-15 page research paper is required for this class; more details are provided in the full syllabus. This paper will count for 40% of the grade.

(3) Preparation, Attendance, and Participation: Students are required to complete the assigned readings before class, attend class regularly, and participate actively in class discussion. Class preparation will be measured through approximately six to ten (unannounced) quizzes given at the very beginning or ending of class periods, which together will be worth 10% of the total course grade; each student's quiz grade will be determined by dropping the lowest quiz score.

Rest of Syllabus

The remainder of the syllabus -- course rules, notes about the academic honor code and the Americans with Disabilities Act, assigned readings, and details about the research papers -- is only available in the complete syllabus (in PDF format). Be sure to print out that complete syllabus and be familiar with it, so that you do not fall behind or miss any assignments during the semester.




Assigned Readings

The assigned readings for this course are listed in the PDF-format syllabus. This section of the online syllabus only includes links to JSTOR readings, to make it easier for students to acquire these readings. All other online readings are available on Blackboard.


http://www.paulhensel.org/Teaching/psci4821.html
Last updated: 24 August 2015
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